Tennessee

Current Codes

Residential, Commercial
2006 IECC Mandatory
Friday, July 1, 2011
Thursday, June 2, 2011
Public Buildings
ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Mandatory
Friday, July 1, 2011
Thursday, June 2, 2011
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Additional Code Information

Advocacy Opportunities

Status

Explanations

Adopt Mandatory Codes

(Residential Only)

 

 

 

 

 

Residential

The state legislature amended Public Chapter No. 907 by establishing the 2003 IECC as the mandatory minimum energy conservation standard for new residential construction beginning January 1, 2009. The law strongly encourages builders to voluntarily adhere to the 2006 IECC standards for residential and commercial construction.

In June 2009, the Tennessee legislature placed residential energy efficiency codes under the purview of the State Fire Marshal, who shall select the specific ICC code edition to be implemented. The bill does not reference the IECC, instead establishing the IRC and IBC as adopted codes.

Commercial

Tennessee has a voluntary commercial code drawn from ASHRAE 90A-1980 and 90B-1975. Jurisdictions may elect to adopt a more stringent code.

Adopt an Automatic Review & Update Process

 

The state does not have a formal schedule for updating and reviewing building energy codes. The last update was in January 2009. 

Create a Regulatory Process

 

Changes to the Tennessee's energy code must proceed through the state legislature or through the State Fire Marshall’s office.

Improve Compliance

 

Residential

Compliance can be demonstrated during plan review and verified by local inspection. Some jurisdictions may accept a registered design professional's seal on a letter stating that the design complies with the code.  

REScheck may also be used to demonstrate compliance.  

Commercial

Compliance can be demonstrated during plan review and verified by local inspection. Some jurisdictions may accept a registered design professional's seal on a letter stating that the design complies with the code.

COMcheck may also be used to demonstrate compliance. 

Eliminate Weakening Amendments

 

The Tennessee Clean Energy Future Act of 2009 (companion bills HB 2318 and SB 2300) is a wide-ranging bill tackling several major recommendations by the Governor's energy task force, created in March 2008. Sections 16 to 23 of the governor's proposed amendments to the bills would establish the IRC for new one- and two-family dwellings and the IBC for all other new residential construction. They would also increase state support for building code inspection operations.  These provisions would become effective July 1, 2010.

Other elements of Governor Bredesen's proposal include requiring more energy efficiency in state buildings and vehicles and expanding tax incentives for job creation in the green energy field.

Add Strengthening Amendments

   

Allow Innovation at the Local Level

   

Set Milestones

   

Adopt Green Codes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City Wide Programs:
Germantown, Tennessee.
Smart Code, 2007

Program Descriptions:
All new municipal construction to earn LEED certification. The policy applies to municipal buildings in which at least 60% of the square footage is occupied space. The policy additionally provides a density bonus of one additional story for private construction in Smart Growth Zones T4, T5, and T6 with proof of LEED Certification.

Energy Standard:
Commercial LEED Certification: below is summarized from LEED NC, details vary according to certification program. Mandatory: minimum 10% compliance beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2007, or use of NBI's Core Performance or one of ASHRAE's Advanced Energy Design Guidelines. LEED options include: optimize energy performance, on-site renewable energy, enhanced commissioning, enhanced refrigerant management, measurement & verification, and green power.

City Wide Programs:
Nashville, Tennessee
Green Permit and Zoning Incentives, 2008

Program Descriptions:
Nashville has a voluntary green certificate program, offers density bonus incentives in designated neighborhoods, and has mandatory requirements for municipal buildings.  In order to receive a green certificate of occupancy commercial buildings must earn LEED Certified, specifically requiring WEc3.1 (20% Water Use Reduction); residential buildings must submit proof of LEED or EarthCraft Homes certification.   In the downtown area, development in the Central Business District is eligible to increase the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) cap from 15 to 17 if the project achieves LEED Silver. Projects in this district benefit from a FAR of 19 if the project achieves LEED Gold. In the SoBro neighborhoods, developments are eligible to increase the FAR cap from 5 to 7 if the project achieves LEED Silver. Projects in these neighborhoods benefit from a FAR cap of 9 if LEED Gold is achieved.     All public and publicly-funded building projects of 5,000 ft2 or greater (or exceeding $2M in project costs) be designed and built to LEED Silver certification of the most appropriate LEED Rating System.

Energy Standard:
Commercial LEED Certification: below is summarized from LEED NC, details vary according to certification program. Mandatory: minimum 10% compliance beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2007, or use of NBI's Core Performance or one of ASHRAE's Advanced Energy Design Guidelines. LEED options include: optimize energy performance, on-site renewable energy, enhanced commissioning, enhanced refrigerant management, measurement & verification, and green power.     Earthcraft Energy Efficiency Requirements: include Energy Star certification and compliance with 2006 IECC.   Mandatory requirements include an extensive air sealing checklist, blower door test minimum at 0.50 ELR = sfm/sfbe, increased insulation levels (per climate zone), window U-factor of 0.65, HVAC designed and installed per ACCA Manuals J and S, duct blaster test results < 15% floor area TOTAL leakage and < 6% floor area leakage to outside, includes optional requirements in air sealing, insulation, windows, roof, HVAC, ductwork, duct blaster test, water heating and lighting, and appliances. Sample options include interior air sealing, blower door test results at < .40 or <.45 ELR, increased insulation, certified passive solar design, attic radiant barrier, Energy Star roof, zone controlled HVAC, duct in conditioned spaces, increased return air ducts or transfer grills, reduced duct blaster results, solar water heating, Energy Star advanced lighting package.

August 2009

Resources:


ICLEI - international association of local governments and their associations
www.iclei.org  
Tennessee has six local government members:
Chattanooga, Gatlinburg, Knoxville, Nashville, Oak Ridge, and Signal Mountain.

Mayors Climate Protection Center
www.usmayors.org  
Six Tennessee Mayors have signed The U.S. Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement:
(City)
Chattanooga, Cookeville, Crossville, Franklin, Nashville, and Signal Mountain.

International Codes Council (ICC) Regional Support and State Offices:
Ms. Kathy Slawinski
ICC Chicago District Office
4051 West Flossmoor Road
Country Club Hills, IL 60478
Phone: 1-888-422-7233, Ext. 4319
KSlawinski@iccsafe.org

Mel Cosgrove
Senior Regional Manager
1056 Kingston Road
Chelsea, AL 35043
[P] 1-888-422-7233, Ext. 5229
MCosgrove@iccsafe.org

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